Curriculum Guide

Click a subject to view that subject’s curriculum across all grades, then scroll down. Click a grade to view that grade’s curriculum across all subjects, then scroll down. Click a • to view one subject for one grade, then scroll down.

Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade
Language Arts
Math
Social Studies
Science
Foreign Language
Library
Music
Physical Education
Computer Technology
Field Trips
Adv. Level/Language Arts
Adv. Level/Math
Art

Reading and Literature

Open Court
Clarifying, predicting, drawing conclusions from sequenced events; alphabet, consonant, and vowel sound recognition; sight word recognition; rhyming words.

Mechanics

Open Court
Printing and informal spelling; capitalization; punctuation; phonics; arranging letters in alphabetical order.

Writing

Open Court
Simple spelling, punctuation and grammar; group and individual writing activities based on familiar experiences and literature.

Reading and Literature

Open Court
Comprehension strategies, phonics, predict outcome, decoding, sight vocabulary, sequence events, fiction and nonfiction, fantasy and reality, main idea, fluency, read for pleasure.

Language Conventions

Open Court
Spelling taken from the reading text, Grammar and parts of speech: Noun/Verb tense, capitalization, singular and plural, alphabetical order, possessives, compound words, contractions.
Punctuation: periods, question marks, exclamation point, introduction to quotation marks.

Writing

Open Court
Zaner-Bloser Handwriting
Writing process: pre-write, draft, edit and publish, creative and functional writing, phrase, sentence, paragraph formation, logical sequencing, application skills.

Listening and Speaking

Open Court
Interactive drama projects through curriculum.

Reading and Literature

Open Court
Fiction and non-fiction stories, decoding, vocabulary, main idea, sequencing, predicting, directions, relevant use of context, introduction to research, cause and effect, directions, oral fluency. Introduction to chapter books, book reports assigned throughout the year.

Language Conventions

Open Court
Spelling and vocabulary taken from the reading text. Grammar and parts of speech; adjectives, adverbs, nouns, verbs, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, prefixes, suffixes, phonics, dictionary skills. Punctuation; periods, question marks, exclamation point, introduction to quotation marks.

Writing

Open Court/Zaner Bloser
The writing process; paragraph formations, descriptive and expository writing, journal writing, poetry, introduction to letter writing, and introduction to research. Mastery printing and introduction to cursive writing.

Listening and Speaking

Open Court
Students give oral presentations to the class as part of the Dinosaur Reports.

Reading and Literature

Open Court
Silent/oral reading of a variety of genres; fluency and comprehension development through a variety of skills and strategies; vocabulary development, and use of sentence and word context to find meaning of unknown words; distinguish between common forms of literature, plot characterization and setting; book reports, and introduction to research. Analysis of a chapter book.

Language Conventions

Open Court Spelling
Spelling and vocabulary development using word families. Grammar; parts of speech: nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs; sentence and paragraph structure; mechanics; punctuation; dictionary and thesaurus practice; complex word families; multisyllabic words; prefixes, suffixes; antonyms, synonyms, and homonyms.

Writing

Open Court/Zaner-Bloser Cursive
The writing process; paragraph construction; creative writing; descriptive, narrative and expository writing; poetry; writing formal and informal letters in format; writing legibly in cursive.

Listening and Speaking

Open Court
Responding orally to literature; develop appropriate speaking voice, diction and pace in oral presentations to the class in the form of biography and Native American Reports; reader’s theatre and dramatic presentations.

Reading and Literature

Open Court
Reading a variety of genres of literature emphasizing vocabulary; fluency; figurative and metaphorical use of words; drawing inferences and conclusions from reading; identifying main conflict or plot; contrasting motives of characters; literary devices; imagery, metaphor, similes; how author’s influence readers, perspectives; relating literature to the social studies curriculum through performance of plays based on the works of Laura Ingalls Wilder; in
depth analysis of the novels Farmer Boy and Island of the Blue Dolphins. Book reports throughout the year in creative formats.

Language Conventions

Open Court
Spelling and vocabulary developed through exploration of root origins, suffixes and prefixes. Rules of grammar and punctuation; verb tense, periods, question marks, exclamation points, commas, apostrophes, quotation marks and capitalization. Sentence analysis stresses nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions. Students learn research skills through the use of internet, dictionaries, thesaurus, and encyclopedias.

Writing

Open Court
Writing in a variety of formats including poetry, descriptive, expository, narrative, persuasive, business and informal letter format, and historical fiction; emphasis is placed on writing in the mastery of a strong paragraph with topic sentence and supporting details; utilization of thesaurus and dictionary skills; basic keyboarding and formatting computer skills; and continued development of cursive writing.

Listening and Speaking

Responding orally to literature; skills of diction; oral expression, pace, and volume control are developed through a biography report presentation, play production, and social studies research project presentation.

Reading and Literature

Open Court
Comprehension strategies: students read and comprehend a variety of genres by using their knowledge of textual structure, organization, and purpose, including: classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspaper, and online information; analyze text that is organized in sequential or chronological order; draw inferences and conclusions about text and support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge; identify elements of plot and make connections between literary works; explore characteristics of poetry and symbolism; understand the figurative and metaphorical use of words in content, in-depth independent and guided novel study with cross curriculum connections.

Language Conventions

Open Court
Spelling and vocabulary development; spell roots, suffixes, prefixes, contractions, and syllable constructions correctly; abstract, derived roots and affixes from Greek and Latin; systematic vocabulary development; synonyms, antonyms, and homographs; Grammar and punctuation review with continued verb study.

Writing

Students create multiple-paragraph narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive compositions. Establish plot, point of view, setting, and conflict. Provide details and transitional words that link one paragraph to another in a coherent way, and have a concluding paragraph that summarizes the topic. Students evaluate and revise writing to improve and clarify meaning by adding, deleting, and rearranging words and sentences. Sentence structure; students identify and correctly use prepositional phrases, appositives, verbs, pronouns, and modifiers.

Listening and Speaking

Students respond orally to literature by; asking questions, summarizing significant events and details, and articulate an understanding of multiple ideas communicated by the literary work. Students deliver clear, focused, and planned presentations with awareness of audience.

Open Court

Comparing, classifying and counting objects; writing numbers; recognizing and creating patterns; introduction of money, time, measurement, addition, subtraction, word problems, probability; reading and creating graphs and maps.

Number Sense

Count, read, and write numbers up to 100. Compare and order whole numbers to 100 by using the symbols for less than, equal to, or greater than (<,=,<,>). Know addition facts (sums to 20) and the corresponding subtraction facts and commit them to memory. Identify one more than, one less than, 10 more than, and 10 less than a given number.
Count by 2s, 5s, and 10s to 100. Using estimation strategies in computation in problem solving that involve numbers that use the ones, tens and hundredths places. Identify and know the value of coins and show different combinations of coins that equal the same value. Solve addition and subtraction problems with one and two digit numbers.

Algebra and Functions

Write and solve sentences from problem situations that express relationships involving addition and subtraction. Understanding the meaning of the symbols +, -, =. Create problem situations that might lead to given number sentences involving addition and subtraction.

Measurement and Geometry

Students identify common geometric figures, classify them by common attributes, and describe their relative positions or their locations in space.

Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability

Students organize, represent, and compare data by category on simple graphs and charts. Students sort objects and create and describe patterns by numbers, shapes, sizes, rhythms, or colors.

Mathematical Reasoning

Make decisions about how to set up a problem. Solve problems and justify their reasoning. Note connections between one problem and another.

Number Sense

Place value of whole numbers up to 1,000.
Calculate and solve problems involving addition and subtraction of two and three-digit numbers. Introduction to the multiplication tables from numbers 1 to 10. Model and solve simple problems involving multiplication and division. Understand that fractions and decimals refer to parts of a set and parts of a whole. Model and solve problems by representing, adding, and subtracting amounts of money.

Algebra and Functions

Model, represent, and interpret number relationships to create and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

Measurement and Geometry

Understand that measurement is accomplished by identifying a unit of measure, repeating that unit, and comparing it to the item to be measured. Identify and describe the attributes of common figures.

Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability

Collect numerical data and record, organize, display, and interpret the data on bar graphs and other representations. Demonstrate an understanding of how patterns grow and describe them in general ways.

Mathematical Reasoning

Make decisions about how to set up a problem. Solve problems and justify their reasoning. Note connections between one problem and another.
CML Meets (California Math League).
Daily Star Voyagers to supplement daily work.

Number Sense

Place value of whole numbers up to 10,000; calculate and solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division; memorize to tomaticity the multiplication table for numbers between 1 and 10; describe and compare simple fractions and decimals.

Algebra and Functions

Learn to select appropriate symbols, operations, and properties to represent, describe, simplify and solve simple number relationships. Solve simple problems involving a functional relationship between two quantities.

Measurement and Geometry

Choose and use appropriate measurement tools to quantify the properties of objects, such as length, weight, perimeter, and area; describe and compare the attributes of plane and solid geometric figures and use their understanding to show relationships and solve problems.

Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability

Conduct simple probability experiments by determining the number of possible outcomes and make simple predictions.

Mathematical Reasoning

Make decisions about how to approach problems and use strategies, skills and concept, such as estimation, to find solutions. Move beyond a particular problem by generalizing to other circumstances. Participation in California Math League meets. Daily Star Voyagers encompass all strands.

Number Sense

Students understand the place value of whole numbers and decimals to two decimal places and how whole numbers and decimals relate to simple fractions, round numbers through the nearest hundred thousand, use the concepts of negative numbers, extend knowledge of addition, subtraction, multiplication; multiply multidigit and two digit numbers and divide multiple digit dividends by single digit numbers, factor small whole numbers. Basic fact memorization in four operations is mastered.

Algebra and Functions

Students use and interpret variables, mathematical symbols, know how to manipulate equations, understand perimeter and area, use two dimensional coordinate grids to represent points and graph lines and simple figures.

Measurement and Geometry

Students demonstrate knowledge of plane and solid geometric objects and use this knowledge to show relationships and solve problems, know technical definitions of triangles and polygons, understand congruency, and identify lines, points, rays, and diameter, radius, acute, obtuse, and right angles as well as isosceles, scalene, equilateral, and right triangles.

Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability

Students organize, represent, and interpret numerical and categorical data, identify mean, median, and mode. Students make predictions for simple probability, design and interpret graphs in bar, line and pictorial format.

Mathematical Reasoning

Students make decisions about how to approach problems, use strategies, skills, and concepts in finding solutions, and move beyond a particular problem by generalizing to other situations. Word problems, strategical games, and mind bender problems facilitate these skills. Compete in CML (California Math League) meets and complete daily Star Voyager activities which meet all strands.

Number Sense

Four arithmetic operations applied to whole numbers, decimals, fractions, order of operations, addition and subtraction of negative numbers, percents, exponents, prime and composite numbers, ratios.

Algebra and Functions

Evaluating expressions, function machines, ordered pairs, graphing, and solving linear equations (Hands-on Equations).

Measurement and Geometry

Symmetry, angle measurement, lines, area of a triangle and quadrilateral, congruence and similarity, transformations, circumference of a circle, concept of volume.

Statistic, Data Analysis, and Probability

Mean, median, mode, concept of probability.

Mathematical Reasoning

Application of problem solving strategies through Continental Math League (CML) meets. Daily Star Voyagers encompass all strands.

Self awareness; family; community; holidays; state; oceans and continents; historical figures; need for rules and problem solving.

School

This unit introduces the concepts of civic responsibility in ways that are meaningful to first grade students. It begins with the fable “The Lion and
the Mouse,” which emphasizes that friendly behavior can have unexpected results and can come from unexpected sources.

Town and Country

In this unit, we move from the students’ immediate surroundings of the classroom environment toward a view of the larger world, including their own neighborhood. Students explore the concepts of change over time, characteristics of places, food production, basic needs, and important links with other places.

City and Suburb

We examine city life, as well as suburban communities and their connections to the cities. This unit helps students to understand social and economic links to other people and places, urban change and its effects over time, and the role of labor.

All Around the Big World

This unit focuses on the concepts about community life and economics and how they are applied to the larger world. Students learn about the interdependence of people around the world as people products move from place to place.

Depending on Others

This unit introduces students to the idea that they depend on many people to satisfy their basic needs. It begins with a story of a real family who owns and operates a farm. Students learn that food suppliers depend on consumers to buy food. Students learn that they are consumers.

Knowing your Family

The students are introduced to the concept of ancestor. They examine the physical and cultural contributions that ancestors make to their descendants. Immigrants are introduced from a variety of cultures.

Living in Our Country

We look at the United States and its people. As citizens of the United States, Americans have one flag, one president, and a belief in freedom. There is a focus on three American holidays: Thanksgiving, the Fourth of July, and Presidents’ Day. We are introduced to two of our national symbols: the American flag and Statue of Liberty. Finally, we expand on the concept of “Being a Citizen”.

People Who Have Made a Difference

This unit focuses on the lives of six extraordinary individuals who have made life better for many people. Each biography discusses how a childhood talent, interest, or difficulty contributed to the career or path chosen by the adult.

Community and Geography

Learn to identify geographical features in the local area. (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, and lakes). Use and understand the basic elements of a map: a map key, a compass rose, and scale. Identify climate and resources and their importance to communities.

Governing Our Land

Understand the role of rules and laws in our daily lives and the basic structure of the U.S. Government. Understand the role of citizenship and how they can participate in classroom, community and civic life. Participate in a class election to understand the election process.

Natural Landscapes

Examine how oceans, lakes and rivers shape our land. Look at various habitats and how the land, plants and animals are interdependent, as well as the way plants and animals adapt to these environments. Construct a habitat with appropriate land features, plants and animals to illustrate what they have learned

The First Americans

Learn about the Native American Indians and how their geographic setting affected their lives. Explore how each group adapted to the land and used natural resources to meet basic needs. Learn the values and belief systems of the people, which reflect their deep regard for the land. Conduct research on a tribe, prepare a report, and construct a three dimensional project to share with the class.

The Settlement of the United States

Learn about why explorers came to what is now the United States, and what it was like living in those early communities. Understand how the communities changed over time and trace their westward expansion.

Geography of California

Students create California maps to explore physical features, geographical locations, social and economic areas, natural resources, and landmarks.

Mexican California

Rancho life is explored through everyday life of the early Spanish soldiers and Californians. Economic interest in the area and early trade routes are explored. Study culminates in a “Rancho Day” in which students do activities such as write a land grant request, dip candles, brand cattle, design a ranch brand, and make carne seca.

California Missions

Students study the lifestyles and relationships of missionaries, Spaniards, and Native Americans on the missions as well as physical traits and legacies of individual missions. The unique interdependency between the pueblos, presidios and the missions is investigated. Our floor to ceiling mural map of California and correspnding mission models supply visual understanding of architecture, trade, and economic development.

Gold Rush

Students experience the excitement of the 49er rush for land through research and hands on mining, weighing the gold, and social activities popular in the days of the gold rush. These hands on experiences serve as the knowledge base for an original historical novel written by the student.

Independent Research

Students choose an aspect of California history not previously covered in the curriculum, research the topic, design a three dimensional project and orally present the topic to the class.

The United States: Past and Present

Examines the diversity of the American people. Describes the process that brought people from a variety of countries to the U.S.: immigration.
Introduces the study of American geography.
Exploring and Settling America
Study North America before the arrival of Europeans and the evolution of American Indians. European exploration and colonization of the Americas. Establish reasons for and patterns of colonization, introduce important colonies in each geographic area, and describe the interaction between the European colonists and the native inhabitants of each region.
Life in the English Colonies
Discusses the political, economic, religious, and social aspects of the Southern, New England, and Middle colonies.
The Struggle for Independence
Establishes the atmosphere in the colonies in the 1750’s. How the Seven Years’ War led to changes in the relationship between the colonists and Britain. Analyzes the change in British policy and the colonist’s reaction to taxation without representation. Political causes of the Revolution, military strategies, and the consequences for colonists not involved in fighting. Political and cultural unification of the 13 former colonies during and after the Revolutionary War.

KINDERGARTEN

Characteristics of Living Things

What is living and non-living. Parts of plants; what do plants need to grow and change. Animal needs–habits, environments and life cycles of insects, amphibians and mammals.

Exploring with the Senses

The five senses. Grouping objects by properties. Using smell, taste, and sound to identify objects. How are materials similar and different. Basic Anatomy.

Looking at the Earth and Sky

What can you see in daytime/nighttime. The plants and stars, our moon and the patterns of stars. Weather on earth and its effect on seasons.

How we use parts of the body

Identifying internal, external body parts – hands, bones and muscles. How we use our bodies, hearts and brains. How do our senses help us? I am me!

Kinds of Living Things

How are plants and animals alike and different? What coverings do they have on their bodies? How are they grouped? How do they grow and change?

Weather and Seasons

Overview of different types of weather, the Sun. Seasons and life cycles. Why does it rain? What effect does the wind have on weather patterns. How do people, plants and animals adapt to seasons?

Solids, Liquids and Gases

Grouping solids, liquids and gases. How are they different, how do they change?

Health

What kind of food does your body need to be healthy? Good eating and exercise habits.

Life Cycles of Animals

Constancy and change. How do plants grow? How is their life cycle different to animals?

Energy and Motion

Observing light and its properties. Changes in forces and motion. Heat and its properties. Experimenting with sound waves.

earth’s Materials

How is soil made? Comparing different properties of rocks and minerals.
Erosion. Fossils and Dinosaurs.

Germs

How do we get sick? Viruses, bacteria and molds. How can we fight germs? Staying healthy.

Relationship Among Living Things

What do different living things need? Food webs and chains. Roles of predators and prey. The environment.

The Sun, Moon and Earth

Their properties and relationships. Motion of the earth and moon, lunar year, sun’s path and the constellations. Effects of the moon on the earth and tides.

earth’s Resources

Air and water and their effects on our planet. Using natural resources wisely. Forces of nature on the earth’s surface.

Matter and Energy

What is matter? Can it be changed? Properties of energy and heat. Forces, motion and machines. Simple machines and the forces they exert.

Earth’s Land

How does movement, water and the elements shape the earth’s surface? Importance of natural resources. Why are soil and water so important?
Why should we recycle? Problem solving.

Populations and Ecosystems

What are they? How does energy and matter flow through them? How are the earth’s ecosystems so diverse and why are they changing?

The Solid Earth

Classifying rocks and minerals, the Mohr Scale of hardness. How does the planet’s surface change over time?

Structures of the Earth

Faults, mountains and volcanos. What are the forces that form them?

Magnetism and Electricity

What are magnets and how do their forces affect us? Making compasses. Static electricity and electric currents and circuits. Why is electricity useful?

The Solar System

Exploring the night sky, astronomy and space objects. What is the solar system made of? How did it form? Inter-planetary distance, size and relationship in the solar system. Stars, their life cycle from birth to destruction. Measuring light speed and the shape of galaxies.

Life Processes

What are living things? Cells, DNA and parts of an animal. Plant parts and how do they help us? Producers and consumers.

Digestion, Circulation and Body Systems

How do the body systems work and how are they connected? The heart, lungs and blood circulation.

Life Cycles

Stages of an animal life cycle. Comparing and contrasting life cycles of humans, insects and brine shrimp. Vertebrates versus invertebrates (no backbone).

The Nature of Matter

Matter, its mass and volume. How does energy affect matter and its structure? How can you classify matter? Mixtures and volumes. Chemistry of matter, bases, acids, salts, polymers and plastics.

Water on Earth

Where do we find water and how does it move? Why is it important and how do we protect our resource?

Weather and Climate

The air around us, properties of air and its effect on weather. Measuring pressure, wind speed, and direction. Weather patterns around the earth.

What factors affect climate?

Marine Biology

Collecting and identifying seashells. Studying a 24 hour cycle on a seashore. The tides, sea animals, food chains, algae, and environmental issues. Culminates with a three day stay at the Catalina Island Marine Institute.

Developing listening and speaking skills in a Romance or Classical language through songs, movement, pictures, coloring, puppetry, role playing and games. Geography, history, and heroes are introduced through telling stories and myths. The language is taught using words that are similar to English.

Continued development of listening and speaking skills in the foreign language through songs, movement, coloring, story telling and games. The total physical response technique is utilized, whereby the multiple intelligences of each child is valued and encouraged.

Listening and speaking skills are further developed. Writing and reading skills in the target language are encouraged. The rudiments of grammar are introduced.
Vocabulary in the foreign language is learned through various games and writing exercises.

Continued development of proficiency in reading, writing, listening and speaking in the foreign language. Work is done regularly with a textbook, and progress is measured by the students’ ability to understand and translate passages in the textbook. Students learn about cultures in the countries where the target language is spoken.

Further development in reading, speaking and writing in the target language. New grammar is introduced, as more demanding passages are read, translated and discussed. The literature, art, and culture of the target language are encountered through dialogues, games, debates, and art projects.

Communication skills in the foreign language are further refined through reading, writing, and speaking. Projects on particular aspects of the art, history, Music, family life, etc. of the target language culture.

KINDERGARTEN

Story appreciation and comprehension; first steps in book check-out; Library vocabulary-author, title, illustrator, spine, etc.

Story appreciation and comprehension; Library floor plan; picture books and non-fiction, Library vocabulary-author, title, illustrator, spine, call number, etc. Basic categories of Dewey Decimal classification.

Story appreciation and comprehension; Library floor plan; Library vocabulary as above, plus biography, collective biography, fiction, etc. Basic categories of Dewey Decimal classification, poetry appreciation, completion of book logs for various categories.

Story appreciation and comprehension; Library floor plan; Library vocabulary as above; non-fiction emphasis, preparation of non-fiction book report; all categories of Dewey Decimal classification; poetry appreciation, completion of book logs for various categories.

Story appreciation and comprehension; Library floor plan; Library vocabulary as above; non-fiction emphasis, preparation of non-fiction book report; all categories of Dewey Decimal classification; poetry appreciation, completion of book logs for various categories.

Story appreciation and comprehension; Library floor plan; Library vocabulary as above, Non-fiction and all categories of the Dewey Decimal classification; poetry appreciation, idioms, quotations, folklore and classics.

Six qualities:

• Caring
• Respect
• Attitude
• Gratitude
• Self-control
• Perseverance
• Facilitated through:
Assembly presentation (skits, songs, cheers, etc.). School-wide bulletin board. School-wide writing prompts, homework assignments.

Vocal Music

The children learn work and play songs. They learn to match pitch and sing together as a group.

Instrumental Music

The three main instrument families are introduced; wind, strings and percussion. Opportunity is given to make sounds on a representative of each family.

Music Theory

The Music staff and names of the notes on the staff are introduced. Rests are introduced.

Performance

Children prepare songs for presentation at Family Day, character quality presentations, Winter Holidays and the Spring Musical.

Vocal Music

The children learn songs concerning history and holidays as well work and play songs.

Instrumental Music

Rhythm instruments are used to learn ensemble playing. Sight reading is introduced by playing according to “pictures.”

Music Theory

Notes on the staff are reinforced. Time values are introduced.

Performance

Children prepare songs for presentation at Family Day, character quality presentations, Winter Holidays and the Spring Musical.

Vocal Music

The children continue to learn songs that are fun as well as songs that enhance the core curriculum.

Instrumental Music

This grade continues to utilize rhythm instruments. The children learn to play Precorders as an introduction to instrumental playing.

Music Theory

As part of playing the Precorder, the children read Music written for the instrument and apply their knowledge of notes on the staff and time values.

Performance

Children prepare songs for presentation at Family Day, character quality presentations, Winter Holidays and the Spring Musical.

Vocal Music

Children now learn songs by reading Music instead of just lyric sheets. The Honor choir is open to Third Graders.

Instrumental Music

Students begin learning the recorder, a pre-band instrument. Recorder Karate is utilized whereby students can earn different colored belts for their recorder by learning increasingly difficult pieces on the instrument.

Music Theory

Recorder Karate increases the understanding of Music theory.

Performance

Children prepare songs for presentation at Family Day, character quality presentations, Winter Holidays and the Spring Musical.

Vocal Music

Students learn songs by reading Music. Vocal harmony is introduced. Honor Choir is open to this grade.

Instrumental Music

Students continue to utilize Recorder Karate to progress in their understanding of instrumental Music. Technique playing is introduced. Other Orff Instruments are used to introduce “ensemble” playing.

Music Theory

Multi-part playing and singing is introduced. Theory is expanded upon through singing and instrumental playing.

Performance

Children prepare songs for presentation at Family Day, character quality presentations, Winter Holidays and the Spring Musical.

Vocal Music

Solo and small ensemble singing is introduced. Two and three part harmony is read. Honor Choir is open to this grade.

Instrumental Music

Recorder Karate continues to improve skills on the recorder. Solo playing is introduced as well as playing with and/or providing rhythm accompaniment.

Music Theory

Key signatures, and time signatures are introduced as well as reinforcing previously learned theory.

Performance

Children prepare songs for presentation at Family Day, character quality presentations, Winter Holidays and the Spring Musical.

Movement Education

Perceptual motor lessons using bilateral, unilateral and cross-lateral movements. Tested and evaluated by the President’s Fitness Challenge. Circus Skills, Square Dancing Units and the Walking Club Awards Program are introduced.

Report Card Evaluation

Includes skills such as locomotor, tumbling, manipulative (ball and jump roping skills) rhythms, game social, and pre-sport activities.

Leadership

Leadership roles emphasized by becoming the PE teacher one or two times in a year.

Movement Education

Perceptual motor lessons using bilateral, unilateral and cross-lateral movements. Tested and evaluated by the President’s Fitness Challenge. Circus Sklls, Square Dancing Units and the Walking Club Awrds Proram are introduced.

Report Card Evaluation

Includes skills such as locomotor, tumbling, manipulative (ball and jump roping skills) rhythms, game social, and pre-sport activities.

Leadership

Leadership roles emphasized by becoming the PE teacher one or two times in a year.

Movement Education

Review of Kindergarten and First grade curriculum. Tested and evaluated by the President’s Fitness Challenge. Circus Skills, Square Dancing Units and the Walking Club Awards Program are introduced.

Report Card Evaluation

Includes skills such as applying rules, sportsmanship, locomotor dexterity, balancing, flexibility, rhythms, ball handling skills, game skills, participation and effort.

Leadership

Leadership roles emphasized by becoming the PE teacher one or two times in a year.

Movement Education

Skills evaluation in individual and team competitions and games. Tested and evaluated by the President’s Fitness Challenge. Involved in Circus Skills, Square Dancing Units and the Walking Club Awards Program. Pedometer training and measuring are introduced.

Report Card Evaluation

Includes all areas of fitness, health and overall wellness. Know the function of the heart, lungs, five major bones and muscles, and heart rate monitoring.

Leadership

Leadership roles emphasized by becoming the PE teacher one or two times in a year.

Movement Education

More advanced skills, accuracy, strategies, involved with evaluating in individual, partner, groups, team sports and activities. Tested and evaluated by the President’s Fitness Challenge. Involved in Circus Skills, Square Dancing Units, Walking Club Awards Program and Pedometer training and measuring.

Health Education

Includes all areas of fitness, health, and wellness; including personal hygiene, nutrition, muscular systems, skeletal systems, circulatory and digestive systems and basic safety education. Concentration on heart rate monitoring, orienteering with compass reading, and the benefits of an active, healthy lifestyle after elementary school.

Leadership

Leadership roles emphasized by becoming the PE teacher with lesson plans and follow-ups one or two times a year. Involved in the nine week Survivor PE Style, team building and life skills along with mental and physical challenges using the school’s curriculum.

Movement Education

More advanced skills, accuracy, strategies, involved with evaluating in individual, partner, groups, team sports and activities. Tested and evaluated by the President’s Fitness Challenge. Involved in Circus Skills, Square Dancing Units, Walking Club Awards Program and Pedometer training and measuring.

Health Education

Includes all areas of fitness, health, and wellness; including personal hygiene, nutrition, muscular systems, skeletal systems, circulatory and digestive systems and basic safety education. Concentration on heart rate monitoring, orienteering with compass reading, and the benefits of an active, healthy lifestyle after elementary school.

Leadership

Emphasized by becoming the PE teacher with lesson plans and follow-ups one or two times in a year. Involved in the nine week Survivor PPE Style, team building and life skills along with mental and physical challenges using the school’s curriculum.

Basic Operations and Concepts Introduced

Computer awareness, mouse manipulation, keyboard commands, terminology, use of simple graphics, applications and appropriate software are introduced to students at developmentally appropriate ages.

Basic Operations and Concepts

First Grade Students begin to use the computer for creating simple graphics, text entry and editing. Students learn proper use of the computer, turning the computer on and off, opening, saving and editing files. Keyboarding basics are introduced.

Basic Operations and Concepts

Second grade students continue to build on technology knowledge acquired in the First Grade. Keyboarding basics continue in preparation for keyboarding in third grade.

Technology Productivity, Communication and Decision Making Tools

Create developmentally appropriate multimedia products with support from teachers and student partners. This includes a slide show with various pictures the students have created throughout the year. Use technology resources for problem solving. Communication and illustration of thoughts, ideas and stories.

Basic Concepts and Operation

Formal keyboarding begins. Students use keyboard covers to learn proper keyboarding skills.

Social, Ethical and Human Issues

Discussion of basic issues related to responsible use of technology.

Technology Productivity, Communication and Decision Making Tools

Basic use of presentation software is introduced. Students work individually and collaboratively on curricular based projects. Software is used to develop problem solving and logical thinking. Communication and illustration of thoughts, ideas and stories is developed.

Technology Research Tools

Students are introduced to the internet for research of class reports.

Basic Concepts and Operation

Keyboarding skills using keyboard covers to improve speed and accuracy is continued. File management, writing and editing, use of spreadsheets.

Social, Ethical and Human Issues

Discussion of basic issues related to responsible use of technology and information. Consequences of inappropriate use are discussed.

Technology Productivity, Communication and Decision Making Tools

Students learn to use presentation software for report presentations. Students work individually and collaboratively in workstations on class projects. Software is used to develop problem solving, logical thinking, communication and illustration of thoughts, ideas and stories.

Technology Research Tools

The internet is used for research of class projects and evaluation of websites for information accuracy.

Basic Concepts and Operation

Keyboarding, basic operations, use of terminology, use of software and hardware word processing, spreadsheets and desktop publishing are required of all students.

Social, Ethical and Human Issues

Discussion of basic issues related to responsible use of technology and information. Consequences of inappropriate use, advantages and disadvantages technology provides in the daily life of students are topics which are discussed.

Technology Productivity, Communication and Decision Making Tools

Students use presentation software for report presentations. Students work individually and collaboratively in workstations on class projects. Software is used to develop problem solving, logical thinking, communication and illustration of thoughts, ideas and stories. Video editing is introduced.

Technology Research Tools

The internet is used for research of class projects and evaluation of websites for information accuracy. The community strives to develop lifelong learners who are confident in the use of technology to solve problems, access knowledge, think critically, and work collaboratively on challenging, authentic, multidisciplinary activities.

Los Angeles Zoo

The children get an up close view and educational experience of animals found all over our world.

California Science Center

We spend the day exploring over 100 hands on Science experiments. We visit Tess the 50-foot body simulator in World of Life and uncover processes common to all living things, experience a real earthquake and visit seasonal exhibits.

Theatreworks USA Plays

Throughout the year, the children get to experience live theatre.

Natural History Museum

We visit the gem display as a follow-up to our Science fair crystal making project, we explore when dinosaurs lived, and we spend time in the Discovery Room.

Air and Space Museum

To learn about flight and the people who made history.

Science Museum

Spend the day, utilizing the entire facility including, but not limited to, the earthquake displays, the body, and any seasonal exhibits.

Long Beach Aquarium

This is the children’s first experience spending the night away from school. They learn about the community they live in.

Local City Hall

Take a tour of a local city hall and learn first hand how the city government works.

Knott’s Berry Farm

Docent-led tours exploring Native American tribes and culture.

Museum

Explore Native American treasures and traditions at one of several local museums.

Overnight/Day Trip

Third Graders will spend an evening and a day away from school in a learning environment.

Space

Visit local planetarium to “see” the stars and their placement around the sun, the moon and the Earth.

Astrocamp

Three day sleepover trip exploring space, constellations, rockets, atmospheres and gases, electricity and magnetism, lights and lasers, and what it is like to work in zero gravity.

Natural History Museum

Students see actual artifacts about California life from the early Native American days to the present.

Mission Trip

Students visit an actual mission to study life style, architecture, artifacts, handicrafts and everyday life of missionaries and Native Americans.

Rock Quarry

Students investigate natural geologic structures including volcanic origins and collect crystals containing metamorphic and igneous rocks as well as fossils containing sedimentary rock specimens to analyze in the Science lab.

Science Museum

View polished gemstones gathered from around the world.

Knott’s Berry Farm

Docent led tour studying westward expansion and early days in California. This trip includes the opportunity to pan for gold.

Walk Across California

Commercial presentation brought on campus to take students on a “time travel” across California History in a game show format. Presentation culminates in the construction of a 15’x20’ relief map of California.

Trade Fair

Students develop an awareness and appreciation for bartering through creating and trading wares and experiencing the law of supply and demand.

Cabrillo Aquarium

Explore and discover the coastal habitat of Southern California.

Catalina Island Marine Institute

Three day educational trip allowing students to participate in hands-on activities designed to create appreciation of the marine and island environments.

Ben Franklin and The International Printing Museum

Ben Franklin introduces life in Colonial America and demonstrates many of his experiments and inventions.

Knott’s Berry Farm

Energy in Motion; at an intermediate level students will discover how the principles of Newton’s Laws applies to theme park rides.

The Science Center

Explore the World of Life through exhibits and live demonstrations.

Riley’s Farm

An overnight field trip; an interactive living history focusing on the causes of the Revolutionary War.

Walk Through the Revolution

An entertaining and educational way to learn about the courage and determination of the early American patriots. Game show format.

History Comes Alive

The fifth grade Musical production of early American history. Performed at the Norris Theatre.

State Fair

The fifth grade displays their state projects with games, food, and crafts.

Reading and Literature

Open Court Young Scholars Systematic vocabulary development; reading fluency; introduce and explore a variety of genres: fantasy, folklore, tall tales, realistic fiction, historical fiction, biography, and expository texts; comprehension strategies include: responding to essential questions, making predictions, comparing information, restate facts and details in the text to clarify and organize ideas, recognize cause-and-effect relationships within a text, drawing conclusions; compare and contrast plots, settings and characters presented by varied authors; introduce figurative language.

Writing

Collections for Young Scholars Writer’s Handbook. Introduction to the writing process; write clear sentences and paragraphs that develop a central theme and maintain a consistent focus; revise original compositions to improve sequence and detail; journal narratives based on personal experiences; creative writing formats; draft friendly letters in alternative formats; create original books.
Language Conventions Grammar: recognize complete and incomplete sentences, identify and use subjects and verbs correctly in writing simple sentences, identify and use past, present, and future verb tenses in writing; introduction to parts of speech; Punctuation: use commas for dates, city and state, locations, addresses, and items in a series; correctly punctuate quotations; Capitalization: apply prior knowledge of proper nouns, geographical names, holidays, historical periods, and special events; Spelling/Phonics: spell basic short-vowel, long-vowel r-controlled, and consonant-blend patterns correctly, as well as irregular and frequently used words; printing legibly allowing margins and correct spacing between words in a sentence.
Speaking and Listening Oral reading; paraphrase information that has been shared by others; use proper phrasing, pitch, and modulations during book presentations; recitations of poetry; listening critically and responding appropriately to oral communication.

Reading and Literature

Open Court Young Scholars Systematic vocabulary development; reading fluency; introduce and explore a variety of genres: fantasy, folklore, tall tales,
realistic fiction, historical fiction, biography, and expository texts; comprehension strategies include: responding to essential questions, making predictions, comparing information, restate facts and details in the text to clarify and organize ideas, recognize cause-and-effect relationships within a text, drawing conclusions; compare and contrast plots, settings and characters presented by varied authors; introduce figurative language.

Writing

Collections for Young Scholars Writer’s Handbook
Introduction to the writing process; write clear sentences and paragraphs that develop a central theme and maintain a consistent focus; revise original compositions to improve sequence and detail; journal narratives based on personal experiences; creative writing formats; draft friendly letters in alternative formats; create original books.
Language Conventions Grammar: recognize complete and incomplete sentences, identify and use subjects and verbs correctly in writing simple sentences, identify and use past, present, and future verb tenses in writing; introduction to parts of speech; Punctuation: use commas for dates, city and state, locations, addresses, and items in a series; correctly punctuate quotations; Capitalization: apply prior knowledge of proper nouns, geographical names, holidays, historical periods, and special events; Spelling/Phonics: spell basic short-vowel, long-vowel r-controlled, and consonant-blend patterns correctly, as well as irregular and frequently used words; printing legibly allowing margins and correct spacing between words in a sentence.
Speaking and Listening Oral reading; paraphrase information that has been shared by others; use proper phrasing, pitch, and modulations during book presentations; recitations of poetry; listening critically and responding appropriately to oral communication.

Reading and Literature

Open Court Young Scholars Systematic vocabulary development; reading fluency; introduce and explore a variety of genres: fantasy, folklore, tall tales, realistic fiction, historical fiction, biography, and expository texts; comprehension strategies include: responding to essential questions, making predictions, comparing information, restate facts and details in the text to clarify and organize ideas, recognize cause-and-effect relationships within a text, drawing conclusions; compare and contrast plots, settings and characters presented by varied authors; introduce figurative language.

Writing

Collections for Young Scholars Writer’s Handbook
Introduction to the writing process; write clear sentences and paragraphs that develop a central theme and maintain a consistent focus; revise original compositions to improve sequence and detail; journal narratives based on personal experiences; creative writing formats; draft friendly letters in alternative formats; create original books.
Language Conventions Grammar: recognize complete and incomplete sentences, identify and use subjects and verbs correctly in writing simple sentences, identify and use past, present, and future verb tenses in writing; introduction to parts of speech; Punctuation: use commas for dates, city and state, locations, addresses, and items in a series; correctly punctuate quotations; Capitalization: apply prior knowledge of proper nouns, geographical names, holidays, historical periods, and special events; Spelling/Phonics: spell basic short-vowel, long-vowel r-controlled, and consonant-blend patterns correctly, as well as irregular and frequently used words; printing legibly allowing margins and correct spacing between words in a sentence.
Speaking and Listening Oral reading; paraphrase information that has been shared by others; use proper phrasing, pitch, and modulations during book presentations; recitations of poetry; listening critically and responding appropriately to oral communication.

Number Sense:

Four arithmetic operations applied to whole numbers, decimals, fractions; order of operations, addition and subtraction of negative numbers, percents, exponents, prime and composite numbers, ratios.

Algebra and Functions:

Evaluating expressions, function machines, ordered pairs, graphing, and solving simple linear equations (Hands-on Equations).

Measurement and Geometry:

Symmetry, angle measurement, lines, area of a triangle and quadrilateral, congruence and similarity, transformations, circumference of a circle, concept of volume.

Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability:

Mean, median, mode, concept of probability.

Mathematical Reasoning:

Applications of problem solving strategies through Problems of the Week (POW) and Continental Math League (CML) meets. Daily Star Voyagers encompass all strands.

Number Sense:

Mastery of four arithmetic operations with whole numbers, positive fractions and decimals, positive and negative integers; order of operations, percents, exponential notation, scientific notation, multiplication and division using exponents, prime factorization, divisibility rules, prime and composite numbers, ratios, proportions.

Algebra and Functions:

Writing and evaluating expressions, ordered pairs and graphing including negative numbers, solving linear equations (Hands-on Equations), rates, converting one unit of measurement to another.

Measurement and Geometry:

Symmetry, angle measurement, complementary and supplementary angles, area of a parallelogram, triangle, and trapezoid, volume of a rectangular prism, congruence and similarity, transformations, circumference and area of a circle, compass constructions.

Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability:

Mean, median, mode, range, representing data through tree diagrams, tables, and grids, counting outcomes, finding probabilities.

Mathematical Reasoning:

Application of problem solving strategies through POWs and CML meets. Daily Star Voyagers encompass all strands.

Creation of art based on imagination, personal voice and expression. Children are encouraged to draw and paint subjects from their lessons and from real life, and to share their creations. Every artistic expression of a child is viewed positively.

Original artwork is encouraged as children explore their own artistic voice. Lines, color, shape and other visual elements are the choice of the child. Perspective and proportional drawing are introduced, as well as three-dimensional work with models and sculpture.

Original artwork is encouraged as children explore their own artistic voice. Lines, color, shape and other visual elements are the choice of the child. Perspective and proportional drawing are introduced, as well as three-dimensional work with models and sculpture.

Continued use of imagination recall and observation. Focus on details and further work with representational drawing and perspective, along with opportunities for exploring abstract art. Introduction to artwork from other cultures, and from various artists, through imitating or interpreting them in their own way.

Creation of more complex artwork, through initial sketching, planning, griding, and other processes in developing an art project. Using color and form to express moods and ideas. Discussion of how art is made, and what feelings the artist may be communicating.

Creation of art to communicate feelings. Technical skill development in perspective, proportion, color inter-actions, etc. Exposure to other styles and art periods as inspiration for their own work. Effect of light on perception of color, form and texture.

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